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About Us

Nature Kenya—the East Africa Natural History Society (EANHS)—is Africa’s oldest environmental Society. It was established in 1909 to promote the study and conservation of nature in eastern Africa. Nature Kenya mission is  to  "connect nature and people" to take action for biodiversity conservation. ………..read more



Clarke’s Weavers confirmed breeding in Dakatcha Woodland

On 7 and 8 April 2013, a team from Dakatcha Woodland Conservation Group and A Rocha Kenya observed several hundred birds, males and females, actively flying back and forth across the grasses and sedges. They were making their buzzing, sizzling calls. Some males seemed to be displaying, others just perching on the sedges. Several birds flew off to another part of the wetland, and some males were seen carrying strips of sedge as they returned. Then the brownish, rounded shapes of nests were seen among the sedges. One male was weaving more sedge strips onto a nest.

Clarke’s Weaver, Ploceus golandi, confirmed nesting in Dakatcha Woodland Important Bird Area, north of Malindi, Kenya

Clarke’s Weaver, Ploceus golandi, is a bird found only in Kilifi County in Kenya. Clarke’s Weavers have been seen in the Arabuko-Sokoke Forest south of the Sabaki River, and in Dakatcha Woodland north of the river.

They are usually seen in small flocks, feeding on insects and fruits in forests of Brachystegia spiciformis trees. Their nesting site, however, had never been found ….until now—March 2013.

ECO-AGRICULTURE: A Success Story from South Nandi Forest

Nature Kenya introduced forest-adjacent communities to eco-agriculture and nature-based enterprise tools and technologies through the project “Improving livelihoods through sustainable Government, NGO, private partnerships in South Nandi Forest, Western Kenya”, with funding from DFID, the UK aid agency. Some of the people and groups involved realized great success

Water Towers, Forests and Green Economy: Outcome of the First High Level National Dialogue

Kenya’s five key “water towers” (Mount Kenya, the Aberdare Range, the Mau Forest Complex, Mount Elgon and the Cherangani Hills) are the main water catchments for nearly all the main Kenyan rivers. Deforestation of these water towers deprives the economy of 6 billion shillings annually and threatens more than 70% of the country’s water supply and 50% of its electricity, according to UNEP.

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